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Editor’s Note5

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Editor’s Note
'Catulle est à la première page de son roman d'amour' (Benoist). The theme of the shortness of life to the lover goes back to Mimnermus: for expressions of it in the elegists see Tibullus i. 1. 69 f. 'interea, dum fata sinunt, iungamus amores; / iam ueniet tenebris mors adoperta caput', Propertius ii. 15. 23 f. dum nos fata sinunt, oculos satiemus amore: / nox tibi longa uenit nec reditura dies'.
Editor’s Note
1. uiuamus : for the emphatic sense, 'enjoy life', cf. Varro, Sat. fr. 87 Büch. 'properate uiuere puerae quas sinit aetatula ludere esse amare', Copa 38 'pone merum et talos; pereat qui crastina curat: / mors aurem uellens "uiuite" ait, "uenio"', Carm. Epigr. 190. 7 Büch. 'uiue dum uiuis', Cic. Q.F. iii. 1. 12 'sed quando uiuemus?', Hor. Od. iii. 29. 43.
Editor’s Note
2. rumores senum seueriorum : 'the gossip of puritan greybeards'; cf. Prop. ii. 30. 13 'ista senes licet accusent conuiuia duri'.
Critical Apparatus
5. 3 estinemus O, extimemus X
Editor’s Note
3. unius aestimemus assis : there is a curious parallel in Sen. Ep. 123. 11 (the hedonist's advice) 'istos tristes et superciliosos alienae uitae censores, suae hostes, publicos paedagogos assis ne feceris'.
Editor’s Note
5. occidit lux : observe here and in 7. 7 the effect of the break in the last foot caused by the rare monosyllabic ending. Such endings are to be distinguished from those in which an unemphatic monosyllable is combined with a preposition to form a disyllabic or trisyllabic word-group under one accent (10. 31 ád-me, 13. 1 apúd-me, 50. 20 á-te).
Editor’s Note
6. perpetua una : the phrase occurs again, in a very different context, in Cic. Pis. 33 'ut omnes … male precarentur, unam tibi illam uiam et perpetuam esse uellent'. For the idea cf. Hor. Od. i. 4. 15 ff., 28. 15, iv. 7. 13.
Editor’s Note
7. basia : basium (with basio and basiatio) occurs first in Catullus: after him it is common in Martial and Petronius but rare elsewhere (Phaedrus has it once, Juvenal twice, Fronto and Apuleius twice). Plautus and Terence use sauium and osculum, Ovid only osculum. Its origin is obscure; its form points to its being a non-Latin word (intervocalic -s- normally indicates a loan-word unless the -s- is, as in causa, quaeso, usus, esum, etc., a reduction of -ss-; so casa, asinus, fusus are probably borrowings) and it is possible that Catullus brought it (as Quintilian i. 5. 8 says he brought ploxenum) from his native province. Its absence from comedy makes it almost certain that it was not part of the popular language before Catullus' time; but it must have come into popular use later, for, while sauium and osculum died with Latin, basium has survived into all the Romance languages. The distinction made by the ancient grammarians between the three words for 'kiss' (Don. ad Ter. Eun. 456 'oscula officiorum sunt, basia pudicorum affectuum, sauia libidinum uel amorum': cf. Serv. ad Aen. i. 256) is not borne out in usage: see Haupt, Opusc. ii. 106–9.
Critical Apparatus
8 dein mille Aldina, deinde mi rmg: deinde mille V
Critical Apparatus
dein Aldina, da rmg: deinde V
Editor’s Note
8. mille altera : 'a second thousand': so Virg. Ecl. 3. 71 'aurea mala decem misi, cras altera mittam' ('a second ten').
Editor’s Note
9. usque : 'without a break'.
Critical Apparatus
10 dein η‎: deinde V
Editor’s Note
10. milia multa : cf. 16. 12 'milia multa basiorum', 61. 203 'multa milia ludi', 68. 45–46 'dicite multis / milibus'.
Editor’s Note
fecerimus : for facere of making up a total cf. Juv. 14. 326 'fac tertia quadringenta' ('make a third four hundred'), Nepos, Epam. 3. 6 'eam summam cum fecerat'. The quantity of the -i- of -imus (and -itis) was originally long in the perfect subjunctive (an optative formation), short in the future perfect indicative (a conjunctive formation), and this distinction is maintained in Plautus. In later verse, for metrical convenience, it is disregarded: -ī- in the fut. perf., first found here in verse, is shown to have been Cicero's normal pronunciation by his clausulae (Zielinski, Philol., Supp. ix. 772).
Critical Apparatus
11 conturbauimus V: corr. θ‎
Editor’s Note
11. conturbabimus : conturbare, 'to throw one's accounts into confusion' (the object, presumably rationes, is always omitted) is a technical term for fraudulent bankruptcy with concealment of assets; Cic. Att. iv. 7. 1, Q.F. ii. 10. 5, Planc. 68, Mart. ix. 3. 5, Petr. 38. 16 'ne creditores illum conturbare existimarent', Digest xv. 3. 16 'nummos uenditori non soluerat, postea conturbauerat'. Since the verb in this sense is elsewhere used without an object expressed, it is best taken so here, illa being governed by sciamus. H. L. Levy (A.J.P. lxii [1941], 222) sees in the alternation of mille and centum a reference to the abacus. Catullus is keeping a tally, with one pebble in the thousands column, then one in the hundreds, and so on: they will shake the board and obliterate the score. But the technical use of conturbare is too common to be ignored, and he misses the point of it: they will cheat the evil eye, as the bankrupt cheats his creditors, by faking their books.
Editor’s Note
ne sciamus : not merely because 'pauca cupit qui numerare potest' (Mart. vi. 34), but because to count one's blessings is to invite Nemesis and the evil eye.
Editor’s Note
12. inuidere : here in its original use 'cast the evil eye on', the equivalent of fascinare in 7. 12. Pliny uses the two words together: N.H. xix. 50 statues of Satyrs are set up in gardens 'contra inuidentium effascinationes'. The common dative construction has its origin in a personal 'dative of disadvantage' (inuideo alicui aliquid), the accusative being normally suppressed. (See Wünsch in Rhein. Mus. lxix. 133.)
Critical Apparatus
13 tantum r: tantus V
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